Teachings of Vivekananda – 1

Vivekananda
Like fire in a piece of flint, knowledge exists in the mind; suggestion is the friction which brings it out

There are certain works which are, as it were, the aggregate, the sum total, of a large number of smaller works.

Watch a man do his most common actions; those are indeed the things which will tell you the real character of a great man

The men of mighty will the world has produced have all been tremendous workers — gigantic souls, with wills powerful enough to overturn worlds, wills they got by persistent work, through ages, and ages

A fool may buy all the books in the world, and they will be in his library; but he will be able to read only those that he deserves to; and this deserving is produced by Karma. Our Karma determines what we deserve and what we can assimilate.

If what we are now has been the result of our own past actions, it certainly follows that whatever we wish to be in future can be produced by our present actions; so we have to know how to act.

Work for work’s sake. There are some who are really the salt of the earth in every country and who work for work’s sake, who do not care for name, or fame, or even to go to heaven. They work just because good will come of it.

Love, truth, and unselfishness are not merely moral figures of speech, but they form our highest ideal, because in them lies such a manifestation of power.

All outgoing energy following a selfish motive is frittered away; it will not cause power to return to you; but if restrained, it will result in development of power. This self-control will tend to produce a mighty will, a character which makes a Christ or a Buddha.

The ideal man is he who, in the midst of the greatest silence and solitude, finds the intensest activity, and in the midst of the intensest activity finds the silence and solitude of the desert.

But we have to begin from the beginning, to take up the works as they come to us and slowly make ourselves more unselfish every day.

To the man who has begun to hate himself the gate to degeneration has already opened; and the same is true of a nation.

Our first duty is not to hate ourselves, because to advance we must have faith in ourselves first and then in God. He who has no faith in himself can never have faith in God.

True Love…

29 Heartwarming Illustrations That Perfectly Capture What True Love Is All About

By ,Monday, 04 May 2015

We’ve all pretty much seen the elaborate gestures of love—dashing past the airport security gate to proclaim your undying love for your SO, lighting the entire room with candles because how can you possibly have a good time without it, sending exquisite flowers to remind her of your love or booking the entire expensive restaurant all for you and your better half. But is that really what love is all about?

A Korean artist Puuung wants to disagree. “Love is something that everyone can relate to. And love comes in ways that we can easily overlook in our daily lives, so, I try to find the meaning of love in our daily lives and make it into artworks.” Writes Puuung on her Facebook page. These beautiful illustrations capturing the intimate moments of a couple’s life will give you all the feels.

Heartwarming Illustrations That Perfectly Capture What True Love Is All About
Heartwarming Illustrations That Perfectly Capture What True Love Is All About
Heartwarming Illustrations That Perfectly Capture What True Love Is All About
Heartwarming Illustrations That Perfectly Capture What True Love Is All About
Heartwarming Illustrations That Perfectly Capture What True Love Is All About
Heartwarming Illustrations That Perfectly Capture What True Love Is All About
Heartwarming Illustrations That Perfectly Capture What True Love Is All About
Heartwarming Illustrations That Perfectly Capture What True Love Is All About
Heartwarming Illustrations That Perfectly Capture What True Love Is All About
Heartwarming Illustrations That Perfectly Capture What True Love Is All About
Heartwarming Illustrations That Perfectly Capture What True Love Is All About
Heartwarming Illustrations That Perfectly Capture What True Love Is All About
Heartwarming Illustrations That Perfectly Capture What True Love Is All About
Heartwarming Illustrations That Perfectly Capture What True Love Is All About
Heartwarming Illustrations That Perfectly Capture What True Love Is All About
Heartwarming Illustrations That Perfectly Capture What True Love Is All About
Heartwarming Illustrations That Perfectly Capture What True Love Is All About
Heartwarming Illustrations That Perfectly Capture What True Love Is All About
Heartwarming Illustrations That Perfectly Capture What True Love Is All About
Heartwarming Illustrations That Perfectly Capture What True Love Is All About
Heartwarming Illustrations That Perfectly Capture What True Love Is All About
Heartwarming Illustrations That Perfectly Capture What True Love Is All About
Heartwarming Illustrations That Perfectly Capture What True Love Is All About
Heartwarming Illustrations That Perfectly Capture What True Love Is All About
Heartwarming Illustrations That Perfectly Capture What True Love Is All About
Heartwarming Illustrations That Perfectly Capture What True Love Is All About
Heartwarming Illustrations That Perfectly Capture What True Love Is All About
Heartwarming Illustrations That Perfectly Capture What True Love Is All About
Heartwarming Illustrations That Perfectly Capture What True Love Is All About
Heartwarming Illustrations That Perfectly Capture What True Love Is All About

http://www.mensxp.com/special-features/today/25956-29-heartwarming-illustrations-that-perfectly-capture-what-true-love-is-all-about.html

Can you hear a pin drop?

What is the meaning of pin drop silence?
Following are some instances when silence could speak louder than voice.

Take 1:

Field Marshal Sam Bahadur Maneckshaw once started addressing a public meeting at Ahmedabad in English. The crowd started chanting, “Speak in Gujarati. We will hear you only if you speak in Gujarati.” Field Marshal Sam Bahadur Maneckshaw stopped. Swept the audience with a hard stare and replied, “Friends, I have fought many a battle in my long career. I have learned Punjabi from men of the Sikh Regiment; Marathi from the Maratha Regiment; Tamil from the men of the Madras Sappers; Bengali from the men of the Bengal Sappers, Hindi from the Bihar Regiment; and even Nepali from the Gurkha Regiment. Unfortunately there was no soldier from Gujarat from whom I could have learned Gujarati.”………….

You could have heard a pin drop
————————————————–

Take 2:

JFK’S Secretary of State, Dean Rusk, was in France in the early 60’s when Charles DeGaule, the French President, decided to pull out of NATO.

DeGaule said he wanted all US military out of France as soon as possible.

Rusk responded, “does that include the 180,000 who are buried here ?”

DeGaule could not respond.

You could have heard a pin drop
————————————————-

Take 3:

Robert Whiting, an elderly US gentleman of 83, arrived in Paris by plane.

At French Customs, he took a few minutes to locate his passport in his carry on.

“You have been to France before, Monsieur ?” , the Customs officer asked sarcastically.

Mr. Whiting admitted that he had been to France previously.

“Then you should know enough to have your passport ready.”

The American said, “The last time I was here, I didn’t have to show it.”

“Impossible. Americans always have to show their passports on arrival in France !” , the Customs officer sneered.

The American senior gave the Frenchman a long, hard look.

Then he quietly explained …

“Well, when I came ashore at Omaha Beach, at 4:40am, on D-Day in 1944, to help liberate your country, I couldn’t find a single Frenchman to show a passport to…. ”

………….

You could have heard a pin drop
————————–

Take 4:

Soon after getting freedom from British rule in 1947, the de-facto prime minister of India, Jawahar Lal Nehru called a meeting of senior Army Officers to select the first General of the Indian army.

Nehru proposed, “I think we should appoint a British officer as a General of The Indian Army, as we don’t have enough experience to lead the same.”
Having learned under the British, only to serve and rarely to lead, all the civilians and men in uniform present nodded their heads in agreement.

However one senior officer, Nathu Singh Rathore, asked for permission to speak. Nehru was a bit taken aback by the independent streak of the officer, though, he asked him to speak freely.
Rathore said, “You see, sir, we don’t have enough experience to lead a nation too, so shouldn’t we appoint a British person as the first Prime Minister of India?”

You could hear a pin drop.

After a pregnant pause, Nehru asked Rathore, “Are you ready to be the first General of The Indian Army?”…….. Rathore declined the offer saying “Sir, we have a very talented army officer, my senior, Lt. Gen. Cariappa, who is the most deserving among us.”

This is how the brilliant Gen. Cariappa became the first General and Rathore the first ever Lt. General of the Indian Army.

Courtesy: Lt. Gen Niranjan Malik PVSM (Retd), Indian Army

It’s been a long day

Awesome one… Reblogging this one 🙂

Live & Learn

A man takes shower

…Take a shower, wash off the day.
Drink a glass of water.
Make the room dark.
Lie down and close your eyes.
Notice the silence.
Notice your heart. Still beating. Still fighting.
You made it, after all. You made it, another day.
And you can make it one more.
You’re doing just fine.
I’m doing just fine.

~ Charlotte Eriksson, The Glass Child


Credits: Photo: The Guardian. Poem Source: Schonwieder

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Those moments in nature…

Rebloggin this one 🙂

Kelsey Sees

“..when you’re under the silent sea, watching a bright, silent world of fish and coral, when you’re staring up at a sky so bright and dense with stars it makes you gasp, it’s in those moments that you begin to see the fullness of your life, the possibility that still prevails, that always prevails.” -Shauna Niequist

S T A R S

I will never forget a moment I had with the stars, with the Creator of the universe, while camping in Yosemite National Park.

Honestly, I don’t know what exactly it was that made the moment so impactful, but it’s a memory I cherish to this day.

It was a warm August night, laying in the middle of a meadow, feeling the wooden planks of the boardwalk pressing against my back, hearing nothing but silence, my eyes filled with the glimmer of the stars.

Something incredible happened in my soul.

View original post 45 more words

The Ram who came to the rescue of Muslims

Tilak Ram’s humble place in Hashimpura sheltered over 12 Muslims, including many who had no idea what was happening in the by-lanes.

article

It was May 22, 1987. The Provincial Armed Constabulary (PAC) along with the Army had surrounded Hashimpura, a settlement in Meerut. The five lanes where Muslims lived had no rear exit, so there was no escape route.

The Army was searching every house. Muslim men, old, young and children were coming on to the road with their hands raised.

Women were on the rooftops, crying, begging the PAC to let go of their men.

Amid all this horror there was one house where Muslims were safe. Tilak Ram’s humble place sheltered over 12 Muslims, including many who had no idea what was happening in the by-lanes.

When some of their fellow community members were herded into a yellow PAC truck, only to be murdered in cold blood in the next few hours, about 12 people managed to save their lives.

“Thankfully, the Army didn’t search our house. There were about 12 people who stayed with us on that terrible day, May 22,” says Ram, in his late sixties now.

The twelve people left Ram’s house only after the curfew was relaxed. Nayeemuddin, one of them, is all praise for Ram.

“He not only saved people’s lives but became a symbol of Hindu-Muslim amity,” he says.

A Delhi court on March 21, 2015 acquitted all 16 accused in the 28-year-old case. All the acquitted are former personnel of the PAC.

Massacre shattered syncretic culture, says neighbour

Ram’s house, which provided sanctuary to 12 Muslims during the PAC-Army search at Hashimpura in 1987, was not a pucca one then but just brick walls covered by an asbestos sheet. It is located right at the front portion of Hashimpura and welcomes anybody visiting what has become now largely a Muslim ghetto. But that was not the situation before May 1987. Many more Hindus used to stay in Hashimpura.

The riots and communal tension due to the Ramjanmabhoomi-Babri Masjid row, and the massacre changed the demography of Hashimpura, says Sher Ali, a tailor master whose shop ‘Gulmarg tailors’, is next to Ram’s house.

Sitting next to his neighbour on a flat wooden charpoy, Ali, with a big picture of goddess Kaali in the background, talks about the history of Hashimpura.

“What used to be a live example of ganga-jamuni tehzeeb, syncretic Indian culture, gradually turned into a ghetto which came to stand for victimhood of the minority community and its constant search for justice for the massacre of 42 innocent people,” says Ali, while remembering the “good old days” when people didn’t use to be Hindu or Muslim but “friends” whose “houses and hearts” were always open for each other.

Ram, who sacrificed a goat for his favourite goddess Kali on Ramnavami on Saturday became nostalgic. “It was fun to live in those times. Ali and me belong to those times and feel a bit suffocated now,” he gestures towards Ali. Together they looked like a rare specimen from the past. “There was no question of any conflict. Muslims and Hindus used to be religious but not intolerant.”

Satasi ke kaand ne sab kucch badal diya, ham sabke liye. (The massacre of 1987 changed our lives, lives of both Muslims and Hindus,” he says.)

“There used to be religious clashes and communal riots but then things used to calm down. But the massacre of 1987 shook Muslims from inside and even the slightest of tension used to scare us,” says Ali, a man in his early sixties.

When this correspondent begins to take leave, Ram says, “My father Jas Ram was born here and died here. I was born here and I will die here only, as a resident of Hashimpura.”

Ram has a visitor: Sanjay also a resident of Hashimpura, in one of its inner by-lanes. He was just four when the massacre happened. He is happy that his father chose not to leave the area unlike his fellow community members after 1987. He says the situation is not as bad as people think. His best friend is Babu Khan.

“Hatred is in people’s minds and not in their hearts,” he remarks, indicating that all is not lost in Hashimpura.

 Courtesy: http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/the-ram-who-came-to-the-rescue-of-muslims/article7050032.ece